sarah standing in aisle at library

“I have loved libraries since I was a child and rode my bike to the nearest library to find a book to fall into. Reading is a way to escape, but more than that, it is a way of learning that can transform a person’s life. I love libraries because they offer equal access to learning for everyone; they are community gathering spaces; they are safe places. All are welcome.” – Sarah Bain, Spokane Public Libraries

Photo by Sean Girard

Michelle with children

“Sometimes you feel like you fail as a parent, because my kids have had to know what homeless is, they’ve had to know what it’s like not to have food accessible. But the one thing they are blessed with, is they know empathy and they know compassion, and they know how to be resourceful.” – Michelle, Spokane

 

This week we’re featuring local individuals from the upcoming documentary “A Walk Through Poverty” created by Rogue Heart Media, Inc. in partnership with Spokane’s SNAP and John J. Hemmingson Philanthropy. You’re invited to the premiere public screening this Saturday at Gonzaga. See event details here.

Aiden profile, wearing hat

“I think it’s really good for people who have resources, both cash assets and social network – particularly social network – to understand that for a lot of people there isn’t that resource. Like, there isn’t even a social network, to trust that the information you are receiving about a bus, or whatever, is accurate or that if you reveal that you are vulnerable that you won’t get hurt.” – Aiden, Spokane

 

This week we’re featuring local individuals from the upcoming documentary “A Walk Through Poverty” created by Rogue Heart Media, Inc. in partnership with Spokane’s SNAP and John J. Hemmingson Philanthropy. You’re invited to the premiere public screening this Saturday at Gonzaga. See event details here.

Nicole with her family“It really is like walking up a path, and never quite getting to the top… Never quite being able to reach your goal. You can see it, and things do get easier as the path goes up… but it’s a real struggle. We’re just going to keep going and hope for the best, and keep our eye on that goal.” -Nicole, Spokane

 

This week we’re featuring local individuals from the upcoming documentary “A Walk Through Poverty” created by Rogue Heart Media, Inc. in partnership with Spokane’s SNAP and John J. Hemmingson Philanthropy. You’re invited to the premiere public screening this Saturday at Gonzaga. See event details here.

Portrait of Hook

“You’re supposed to pay it forward. When you get blessed with money, or food, or whatever, just pay it forward. What goes around comes around in this life.” – Hook, Spokane Valley

 

The next few posts will feature local individuals from the upcoming documentary “A Walk Through Poverty” created by Rogue Heart Media, Inc. in partnership with Spokane’s SNAP and John J. Hemmingson Philanthropy. You’re invited to the premiere public screening this Saturday at Gonzaga. See event details here.

“I believe in the importance of fun in learning. While working with refugees in our area through World Relief and the Institute for Extended Learning, I’ve had the privilege of getting to know some of our strong, determined neighbors. Although they call me ‘teacher’, I learn from them about the importance of enjoying life, laughing while learning, and not taking yourself too seriously. Once I become a full-fledged teacher, I hope I can pass their wisdom on to others.”

– Renee Kenney, Spokane

Photo by Ryan Kenney

“I love wrestling with the complex issues that face us as a community, particularly getting to connect with and interview others that are driven to support and improve this place we call home. I am constantly aware of what a privilege it is to get to pursue your passion, and for me, that is exploring spaces and stories through filmmaking and photography. Even if someone hasn’t figured out their personal passion yet, I think it all begins with doing – something. Pondering only gets us so far. Engaging online only gets us so far. Doers can influence how a story unfolds, and that opportunity is available to all of us.” -Megan Kennedy, Rogue Heart Media, Spokane

 

Heather on street in West Central Spokane

“I was prescribed a drug called Adderall. It was easy to get it – a questionnaire of five questions – and bam! It was given to me like it was candy.

And in the beginning, I loved this pill. It gave me energy, I was organized and focused, and it made me lose weight. I wasn’t a slave to food anymore! I believed that it was what I needed to resolve all of my issues.

I quickly got addicted to it and it began sapping me of all my strength and sanity. I became a slave to this drug. It drove me to my knees yet again, screaming out to God, begging him to save me. Within 10 months, I went from a fully functioning adult to a mental asylum.

I could tell you stories for hours of how God showed up for me during the lowest point in my life. When nobody else wanted anything to do with me, he wanted everything to do with me. He didn’t care about what I had done and what I became. He loved me right where I was at. And I fell in love with him in return.” – Heather, Spokane

 

Photo by Jessica Morgan

Justin in Corbin Park

“When I was younger, I grew up with this belief that I would do great things and do really important work, and although I think I have gotten to do some of that, I realize now that what’s really important in life is having a sense of belonging. Yesterday I was pushing my daughter on the swings – just me and her –and I realized in that moment, that in her mind, I was the most important person in the world. To me, that sense of belonging is more important than anything that we can accomplish through our talent or achievement.” – Justin, Spokane

Photo by Jessica Morgan